ryanpanos:

Roy-Lawrence Residence | Chevalier Morales Architects | Via

Located outside the village of Sutton, in Quebec’s eastern townships, the Roy-Lawrence Residence is set in a vast estate very much impregnated with the legacy of a Swiss immigrant family that came to Canada in the 1930’s. To this date, the surroundings of the residence are still defined by bucolic landscapes, iconic Swiss chalets and other buildings of similar nature that were erected along the years, always with a consistent touch of nostalgia.

wasbella102:

This is a cream tea :)
Scone, Jam and Clotted Cream, and originates from where I am, Devon, GB
wb102

Some legends are told
Some turn to dust or to gold
But you will remember me, remember me for centuries
And just one mistake
Is all it will take, we’ll go down in history
Remember me for centuries

(Source: heydiddlehiddleston)

I am drunk with the wine of me, intoxicant of my own being.
Muriel Strode, from “Creation Songs”  (via celeritious)

(Source: hellanne, via de-la-valliere)

tattoolit:

"They are the roses in December; you remember someone said that God gave us memory so that we might have roses in December.”
J.M. Barrie, Courage
whiskeyandmisanthropy:

Cheers.

archatlas:

Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs? Aki Inomata

"In this piece I gave hermit crabs shelters that I had made for them, and if they liked my shelters, they made their shells in them. My idea for this piece first came about when I participated in the “No Man’s land” exhibition that was held in the French Embassy in Japan in 2009. This work is inspired by the fact that the land of the former French Embassy in Japan had been French until October 2009, and became Japanese for the following fifty years, before being returned to France. The same piece of land is peacefully transferred from one country to the other. These kinds of things take place without our being aware of it. On the other hand, similar events are not unrelated to us as individuals. For example, acquiring nationality, moving, and migration. The hermit crabs wearing the shelters I built for them, which imitate the architecture of various countries, appeared to be crossing various national borders. Though the body of the hermit crab is the same, according to the shell it is wearing, its appearance changes completely. It’s as if they were asking, “Who are you?””

I was not a lovable child, and I’d grown into a deeply unlovable adult. Draw a picture of my soul, and it’d be a scribble with fangs.
Gillian Flynn, Dark Places (via queenausten)

(Source: fassyy, via queenausten)

Abbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | Posted by CJWHO.com Abbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | Posted by CJWHO.com Abbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | Posted by CJWHO.com Abbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | Posted by CJWHO.com Abbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | Posted by CJWHO.com Abbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | Posted by CJWHO.com Abbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | Posted by CJWHO.com Abbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | Posted by CJWHO.com

cjwho:

Abbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | via

Patrick Jouin and Sanjit Manky is a design tandem whose works meet at the crossroads of industrial production and craftsmanship. In all their projects they seek to maintain a balance between innovation and grace. Their latest project is a fine example of this rule. The designers rearranged the interior of an old Saint-Lazare priory to host a hotel and a restaurant. Over the centuries the building had served monks and nuns, been used as a hospice and at one point even a prison. In 1980s it was first transformed into a hotel. The project reinterprets the story of Saint-Lazare for the future. Corresponding with the space which avoids unnecessary stylistic effects, the designers introduced their own pared-down and elegant style. This resulted as a sensual and refined interior of a mystical, ancient monastery.

„We quietly slipped into the Saint-Lazare priory, immersing ourselves in its history and its uniqueness. We tried to capture its essence, from its monastic simplicity to its prison austerity via the wisdom and philosophy of those who built and lived here. Then we had to fine-tune our approach, to give life to a contemporary vision that would respect and preserve the spirit of the building. We didn’t want the visitor to forget where they were. On the contrary, we wanted to assure an intimate experience of the site, allowing the visitor to appropriate fragments of the past in comfort. Achieving this also meant rising to the challenge of the constraints imposed by the building’s classification as an historic monument, notably that we were not permitted to touch the ceilings and the walls. The best approach was to find a way to turn these constraints into opportunities.”

Photography: Nicolas Mathéus

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And now, Master…

(Source: cierin)

The Flower Garden | Howl’s Moving Castle

(Source: kkkawaiidesu, via littlesweetjellyfishtea)